Competition Gallery

 

James Duncan Clark

Fish Island, August 2013 (graffiti on wall), © James Duncan Clark

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

Using photographs and ephemera found on the streets of east London, Direction of Travel documents a landscape in transition on the periphery of London’s Olympic Park. The work seeks to distance itself from the official, public narrative of the Olympic spectacle and attempts to grapple with the local and everyday, exploring the complex relationship between the landscape and its inhabitants during a time of radical change.

jamesduncanclark.com


Bow, January 2013 (found object - child's cue card, © James Duncan Clark)

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

Using photographs and ephemera found on the streets of east London, Direction of Travel documents a landscape in transition on the periphery of London’s Olympic Park. The work seeks to distance itself from the official, public narrative of the Olympic spectacle and attempts to grapple with the local and everyday, exploring the complex relationship between the landscape and its inhabitants during a time of radical change.

jamesduncanclark.com


Stratford, September 2012 (Billboard outside Westfield Stratford City), © James Duncan Clark

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

Using photographs and ephemera found on the streets of east London, Direction of Travel documents a landscape in transition on the periphery of London’s Olympic Park. The work seeks to distance itself from the official, public narrative of the Olympic spectacle and attempts to grapple with the local and everyday, exploring the complex relationship between the landscape and its inhabitants during a time of radical change.

jamesduncanclark.com


Bow, June 2012 (found object - escort card), © James Duncan Clark

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

Using photographs and ephemera found on the streets of east London, Direction of Travel documents a landscape in transition on the periphery of London’s Olympic Park. The work seeks to distance itself from the official, public narrative of the Olympic spectacle and attempts to grapple with the local and everyday, exploring the complex relationship between the landscape and its inhabitants during a time of radical change.

jamesduncanclark.com


Bow, January 2013 (underpass street lighting), © James Duncan Clark

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

Using photographs and ephemera found on the streets of east London, Direction of Travel documents a landscape in transition on the periphery of London’s Olympic Park. The work seeks to distance itself from the official, public narrative of the Olympic spectacle and attempts to grapple with the local and everyday, exploring the complex relationship between the landscape and its inhabitants during a time of radical change.

jamesduncanclark.com


Hackney, October 2012 (found object - hand-written note), © James Duncan Clark

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

Using photographs and ephemera found on the streets of east London, Direction of Travel documents a landscape in transition on the periphery of London’s Olympic Park. The work seeks to distance itself from the official, public narrative of the Olympic spectacle and attempts to grapple with the local and everyday, exploring the complex relationship between the landscape and its inhabitants during a time of radical change.

jamesduncanclark.com


Fish Island, March 2013 (palm trees in industrial yard), © James Duncan Clark

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

Using photographs and ephemera found on the streets of east London, Direction of Travel documents a landscape in transition on the periphery of London’s Olympic Park. The work seeks to distance itself from the official, public narrative of the Olympic spectacle and attempts to grapple with the local and everyday, exploring the complex relationship between the landscape and its inhabitants during a time of radical change.

jamesduncanclark.com


Bow, April 2013 (found object - laminated photograph of two young boys holding badminton rackets), © James Duncan Clark

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

Using photographs and ephemera found on the streets of east London, Direction of Travel documents a landscape in transition on the periphery of London’s Olympic Park. The work seeks to distance itself from the official, public narrative of the Olympic spectacle and attempts to grapple with the local and everyday, exploring the complex relationship between the landscape and its inhabitants during a time of radical change.

jamesduncanclark.com


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