Competition Gallery

 

Ian Rudgewick-Brown

Point of Influx, HD digital video, Colour/ Sound Duration: 10 min, © Ian Rudgewick-Brown

Course: MA Photography, LCC, UAL

Point of Influx is a 10-minute video and sound piece that recalls a specific time in scientific enquiry: a period when the perception of time and space changed drastically. In 1858 the invention of the telegraph or ‘Victorian Internet’ made it possible to send messages across oceans in a few minutes compared to weeks by ship, creating for the first time a truly global communications network. This work draws parallels with the way our sensory system processes and decodes incoming stimuli and how early telegraph systems deciphered information.

 

rudgewick-brown.com/


Avogadro's Mole, 2013, © Ian Rudgewick-Brown

Course: MA Photography, LCC, UAL

Point of Influx is a 10-minute video and sound piece that recalls a specific time in scientific enquiry: a period when the perception of time and space changed drastically. In 1858 the invention of the telegraph or ‘Victorian Internet’ made it possible to send messages across oceans in a few minutes compared to weeks by ship, creating for the first time a truly global communications network. This work draws parallels with the way our sensory system processes and decodes incoming stimuli and how early telegraph systems deciphered information.

 

rudgewick-brown.com/


Avogadro's Mole, 2013, © Ian Rudgewick-Brown

Course: MA Photography, LCC, UAL

Point of Influx is a 10-minute video and sound piece that recalls a specific time in scientific enquiry: a period when the perception of time and space changed drastically. In 1858 the invention of the telegraph or ‘Victorian Internet’ made it possible to send messages across oceans in a few minutes compared to weeks by ship, creating for the first time a truly global communications network. This work draws parallels with the way our sensory system processes and decodes incoming stimuli and how early telegraph systems deciphered information.

 

rudgewick-brown.com/


Black Park, 2013, © Ian Rudgewick-Brown

Course: MA Photography, LCC, UAL

Point of Influx is a 10-minute video and sound piece that recalls a specific time in scientific enquiry: a period when the perception of time and space changed drastically. In 1858 the invention of the telegraph or ‘Victorian Internet’ made it possible to send messages across oceans in a few minutes compared to weeks by ship, creating for the first time a truly global communications network. This work draws parallels with the way our sensory system processes and decodes incoming stimuli and how early telegraph systems deciphered information.

 

rudgewick-brown.com/


Black Park, 2013, © Ian Rudgewick-Brown

Course: MA Photography, LCC, UAL

Point of Influx is a 10-minute video and sound piece that recalls a specific time in scientific enquiry: a period when the perception of time and space changed drastically. In 1858 the invention of the telegraph or ‘Victorian Internet’ made it possible to send messages across oceans in a few minutes compared to weeks by ship, creating for the first time a truly global communications network. This work draws parallels with the way our sensory system processes and decodes incoming stimuli and how early telegraph systems deciphered information.

 

rudgewick-brown.com/


Black Park, 2013, © Ian Rudgewick-Brown

Course: MA Photography, LCC, UAL

Point of Influx is a 10-minute video and sound piece that recalls a specific time in scientific enquiry: a period when the perception of time and space changed drastically. In 1858 the invention of the telegraph or ‘Victorian Internet’ made it possible to send messages across oceans in a few minutes compared to weeks by ship, creating for the first time a truly global communications network. This work draws parallels with the way our sensory system processes and decodes incoming stimuli and how early telegraph systems deciphered information.

 

rudgewick-brown.com/


Plato's Dream, 2013, © Ian Rudgewick-Brown

Course: MA Photography, LCC, UAL

Point of Influx is a 10-minute video and sound piece that recalls a specific time in scientific enquiry: a period when the perception of time and space changed drastically. In 1858 the invention of the telegraph or ‘Victorian Internet’ made it possible to send messages across oceans in a few minutes compared to weeks by ship, creating for the first time a truly global communications network. This work draws parallels with the way our sensory system processes and decodes incoming stimuli and how early telegraph systems deciphered information.

 

rudgewick-brown.com/


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